Tag Archives: High Priest

To Stand Before God

The boastful shall not stand before your eyes; you hate all evildoers. (Psalm 5:5 ESV)

God is holy, righteous and just in all His dealings with those created in His image. It is the image of God in people that drives them toward Him, for He created all for intimate relationship with Him. Yet, sin drives people away from God and is the reason God judges harshly those who rebel against Him. “The LORD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually”  (Genesis 6:5 ESV). God’s image is not corrupted. However, the vessel that contains His image is bent and broken beyond repair. God does not fix His creation that is broken. He recreates. Jesus calls this being “born again.” “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again he cannot see the kingdom of God” (John 3:3 ESV). Paul calls those who are His, a new creation. “Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come”(2 Corinthians 5:17 ESV). God does not recreate those who continue in their rebellion, and is grieved that those He created for relationship refuse His gift of recreation.

Those who are wicked have set themselves above God. “The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the LORD and against his Anointed, saying, ‘Let us burst their bonds apart and cast away their cords from us’” (Psalm 2:2-3 ESV). God will not allow anyone or anything to take His rightful place. “He who sits in the heavens laughs; the Lord holds them in derision” (Psalm 2:4 ESV). For the High Priest during Jesus’ time to allow the Temple of God to fill with those who cheated God’s people coming to worship Him, was the height of dishonoring God. Wickedness looks at personal accomplishments that are temporary and will fail, over the work of God, which is eternally permanent.

Boastful means to shine or flash a brief light, looking for praise and commendation from those immediately present. It is also the act of a madman and a fool. Those who are insane cannot think or feel in a clear, normal way. God gave His image to people so behavior would be naturally righteous. Sin entered the race and people cannot act in a godly manner without direct intervention. Rebelling against God is insane. Foolishness is a characteristic of a person who has lost reason or is unable to reason, having no understanding and acting in a way that brings hardship and suffering. In Scripture a fool is a wicked and depraved person, who rejects sound wisdom and pursues temporary, sinful pleasures. Those who turned the Temple into a marketplace showed they had no intimate understanding of God, nor valued Him and His house of worship.

God will not allow those who rebel against Him to claim His righteousness. He will judge them. “Therefore the wicked will not stand in the judgment, nor sinners in the congregation of the righteous” (Psalm 1:5 ESV). Those who God identifies with His Son, who are blessed, will stand before Him, shielded by the righteousness of His Son. There are two different words for stand in these first few Psalms. In Psalm 1 the word stand means to rise up before, fixed, validated, proven and fulfilled. This person is covered with the blood of Christ, their sin forgiven and their place before God firmly established. Those who are wicked continue to sin, having rejected the sacrifice of the Son, thinking they are able to stand on their own merits. They cannot stand before God, their works are judged as unrighteous, and are driven from His eternal presence.

In the verse, “the boastful shall not stand before your eyes” (Psalm 5:5 ESV), the word stand means to station oneself, as in a place of authority, or to present oneself. Those who bought and sold animals, traded currency, positioned themselves in the Temple as a necessary part of the Temple worship. With the blessing of the High Priest and those priests who worked in the Temple during their rotation, people had to use these merchants if they wanted to worship God. Annas’ Bazaar was in the Court of the Gentiles, restricting those Gentiles who wanted to learn about God and worship Him in His house to a place filled with worldly activity and noise.Everything about the Temple worship at that time was corrupted and dishonoring to God.

God hates that people are driven away from Him. His Temple, during the time of Christ’s earthly ministry, and at other times during the history of Israel, was turned into a place to worship idols. To hate means to detest, to have an aversion toward. They hate God through their iniquity, which means idolatry and refers to those who hunger and thirst after unrighteousness. Jesus is candid in His assessment of those who train and teach God’s children to sin and rebel. “Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me, but whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him to have a great millstone fastened around his neck and to be drowned in the depth of the sea” (Matthew 18:5-6 ESV). Those who, after rejecting the prompting of the Holy Spirit and the command to repent of their sin are judged and sentenced and executed according to His righteous standard. They will perish.

Those who watched Jesus’ violent action against the merchants questioned His authority. They asked for a sign. “What sign do you show us for doing these things?” (John 2:18 ESV). His answer to them was a prophecy of His ultimate purpose for coming. They would kill Him and He would not stay dead. “Destroy this Temple, and in three days I will raise it up” (John 2:19 ESV). Jesus was speaking about His own body, not about the physical structure of the Temple. John calls Jesus’ body the Temple. “But he was speaking about the Temple of his body” (John 2:21 ESV). These same people would use His words against Him at the kangaroo trial, where they condemned Him, an innocent man, to death. “At last two came forward and said, ‘This man said,“I am able to destroy the Temple of God, and to rebuild it in three days”’” (Matthew 26:60-61 ESV). They do not want to understand God. The collusion of the priests to use the Temple for their own pleasure and profit brings God’s ultimate wrath upon them. They hated Him. He hates their behavior of rebellion against Him and will hold them accountable.

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God’s Holiness

For you are not a God who delights in wickedness; evil may not dwell with you.(Psalm 5:4 ESV)

God cannot abide ungodliness. He separates for eternity those who hate Him from those who love and obey Him. Yet, because of sin, none can work their way into eternity with God. Everyone is ungodly but some recognize their sin, realize the consequences and turn toward God in faith. God honors those who strive to come toward Him in obedience.

Wickedness is a word related to the word wicked first seen in Psalm 1. “Blessed is the man who walks not in the counsel of the wicked” (Psalm 1:1 ESV). David speaks, and Jesus affirms, that God has no delight, which means to take pleasure, in anything that contradicts His holiness. Evil means disagreeable, malignant, bad and describes the thinking of the heart of those who hate God. To dwell means to abide, stay, live and also means to stir up or quarrel and cause strife. God is not pleased with any who fight against Him, who disobey Him, yet seek to live with Him because of His generous and gracious nature. This statement, in Psalm 5:4, is reminiscent of the previous Psalm. “There are many who say, ‘Who will show us some good? Lift up the light of your face upon us, O LORD!’” (Psalm 4:6 ESV).

Jesus delights in entering the House of His Father. Many who lived in the vicinity of the Temple would take advantage of the obedient sacrifices of the people for gain and profit. At the beginning of His earthly ministry, Jesus entered the Temple in Jerusalem during Passover week and drove out the vendors who had set up their wares in the courtyard of the Gentiles. The place was called Annas’ Bazaar. Annas was the father-in-law of Caiaphas, the High Priest.

In the temple he found those who were selling oxen and sheep and pigeons, and the money-changers sitting there. And making a whip of cords, he drove them all out of the temple, with the sheep and oxen. And he poured out the coins of the money-changers and overturned their tables. And he told those who sold the pigeons, “Take these things away; do not make my Father’s house a house of trade.”(John 2:14-16 ESV)

In this marketplace were vendors selling animals for the requisite sacrifices and money-changers who would exchange foreign currency for that used locally. Before a person could offer a sacrifice to God to fulfill their obligations under the law, the animal being sacrificed had to meet the requirements of the law. The animal had to be perfect, with no blemishes. Many people, traveling from great distances, could not bring an animal with them, so after they arrived they bought an animal to sacrifice. The prices for the animals were higher in the temple than anywhere else. Or, if they did bring an animal to sacrifice from their own possessions, a priest had to inspect the animal to ensure it was perfect and suitable for sacrifice. The inspecting priest would find something wrong with the animal and send the pilgrim to the vendor for an exchange and upgrade. Those pilgrims coming from other countries would have to exchange their currency for the local shekel, also at an exorbitant rate. Then they would have to buy an animal with the money left. In all of the exchanges many of the priest would receive a kickback. 

Jesus often visited the Temple often. It was customary for the Jewish people to come to Jerusalem once a year, during Passover, to celebrate God. Annas’ Bazaar was a daily event, for someone was always offering a sacrifice according to the law. Jesus was familiar with the marketplace within the Temple walls. His anger toward the desecration of the Temple had built over time.  At this Passover he took action against those buying and selling in the Temple courts.

He made a whip out of cords and began driving people from the Temple, attacking the vendors selling their wares. It was not that being a seller was wrong. It was that they were selling in the temple and overcharging people to the profit of the priests. He flipped over their tables. He dumped their money on the ground. Jesus violently disrupted the workings of the temple because of the evil dwelling in the house of God. God does not delight in wickedness and evil may not dwell with Him.

Notice what Jesus said when He drove them away. “Take these things away; do not make my Father’s house a house of trade” (John 2:16 ESV). Since His childhood Jesus identified the temple as the house of God and that God was His Father. “Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?” (Luke 2:49 ESV). He was His Father’s Son.“You are my Son; today I have begotten you. Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage, and the ends of the earth your possession. You shall break them with a rod of iron and dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel” (Psalm 2:7-9 ESV). Jesus was doing that which God had given Him to do.

During the first Passover week, at the beginning of His earthly ministry, Jesus shouted the message He was Messiah. He wrote the Laws of the sacrifices. The Temple was His house and that He was in control. He threw down the gauntlet and formally challenged the authority of the religious leaders of His people. His was not a true challenge but a statement of fact that He was their authority.

Peter’s Denial

Studies in First Peter

Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ (1 Peter 1:1 ESV)

Luke 54-60 – Parallel Passages: Matt. 26:31-35, 69-75; Mark 14:27-31, 66-72; John 13:37-38; 18:15-18, 25-27

Peter may be the leader of the group of disciples but he represented every person in his actions at Jesus’ arrest. Do his arrogant boasts of following Christ to prison and death represent all Christians? Do his rash reactions, like swinging a sword and cutting off the ear of one of the people who came to arrest Jesus, represent all Christians? Does his running away when confronted by the world represent all Christians? Peter, and the other disciples, abandoned Christ, just as He said they would. Only Mark and Matthew tell us Jesus’ disciples ran away in fear. “And they all left him and fled” (Mark 14:50 ESV; see Matthew 26:56). Jesus had already predicted that those who were with Him would scatter. During His last the Passover celebration He taught them about Himself and the coming of the Holy Spirit. He was leaving them and going back to His Father.

Behold, the hour is coming, indeed it has come, when you will be scattered, each to his own home, and will leave me alone. Yet I am not alone, for the Father is with me. I have said these things to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world. (John 16:32-33 ESV)

Jesus also tells them that their abandoning Him was prophesied long ago. “You will all fall away, for it is written, ‘I will strike the shepherd, and the sheep will be scattered’” (Mark 14:27 ESV; see Zechariah 13:7). Zechariah wrote his prophecy over 500 years earlier. Jesus does not condemn His disciples for what they will do but encourages them to not allow their fallen nature to overcome them. He tells them to take heart for He has overcome the world.

Peter, and those with him, will run away. We must be honest with ourselves, we would probably run away also, under the same circumstances. I would probably run away. One of characteristics of the fallen nature is the tug and pull away from righteousness even when the image of God within drives toward Him who is righteous. We are afraid of the world and have such little or nonexistent faith in God that when the world rears its violent head we may fight for a moment but eventually flee. No one, in and of themselves, is strong enough to stand against the force of the world directed by the venomous lies of the Deceiver. Only God is strong. We do not overcome the world. Jesus overcomes the world. We must be driven to the place where we recognize His strength in us under His control. This is what happens with Peter and the other disciples.

Once Jesus was arrested Peter and John followed at a distance. We assume John went because John records what happens. John is known to the High Priest and helps bring Peter into the courtyard where Jesus is being interrogated. Three times Peter is asked about his relationship with Jesus and three times he denies knowing Him.

Then they seized him and led him away, bringing him into the high priest’s house, and Peter was following at a distance. And when they had kindled a fire in the middle of the courtyard and sat down together, Peter sat down among them. Then a servant girl, seeing him as he sat in the light and looking closely at him, said, “This man also was with him.” But he denied it, saying, “Woman, I do not know him.”

And a little later someone else saw him and said, “You also are one of them.” But Peter said, “Man, I am not.”

And after an interval of about an hour still another insisted, saying, “Certainly this man also was with him, for he too is a Galilean.” But Peter said, “Man, I do not know what you are talking about.” And immediately, while he was still speaking, the rooster crowed. (Luke 22:54-60 ESV).

Three times in an hour, Peter denied knowing Christ even though he was the leader of the disciples. Two things happened. Jesus who was enduring the derisive grilling of those who hated Him turned and looked at Peter. Jesus knew Peter was there because Jesus was aware of everything that was happening and that would happen. “And the Lord turned and looked at Peter. And Peter remembered the saying of the Lord, how he had said to him, ‘Before the rooster crows today, you will deny me three times.’ And he went out and wept bitterly” (Luke 22:61-62 ESV). When Peter realized what he had done he broke down and wept. He saw the emptiness of his boasting and his actions grieved him.

Our sin and the realization of the consequences of our sin, should drive us to grief. But the life of the Christian does not stop with grief and mourning. Peter did not fade away but became the leader of the Church, the Body of Christ. Peter may have momentarily abandoned Jesus but Jesus will never abandon him, or us. Though Satan asked to sift him, and God gave Satan permission to do so, Jesus still prayed for Peter and told him what to do once the trial was over. “Simon, Simon, behold, Satan demanded to have you, that he might sift you like wheat, but I have prayed for you that your faith may not fail. And when you have turned again, strengthen your brothers” (Luke 22:31-32 ESV). Peter would live out his life in faith doing exactly what Christ instructed. Peter would strengthen all those who follow Christ throughout the ages.

Stricken

Meditations on the Psalms

For you strike all my enemies on the cheek; you break the teeth of the wicked.(Psalm 3:7 ESV)

God develops a number of motifs in the Psalms. One of the patterns He gives in the first three Psalms is judgment of the wicked. Those who actively rebel against Him will experience the fury of His righteous decision.

Psalm 1 tells us the wicked fail in their rebellion. None of their works or words last “but are like chaff that the wind drives away” (Psalm 1:4 ESV). They will not stand before God when He sentences them but will be separated from the righteous (see Psalm 1:5) and will ultimately perish(Psalm 1:6). They will not disappear into nothingness but will continue to exist for eternity outside of God’s presence, never receiving that which sustains spiritual life.

Psalm 2 gives the evidence of the rebellion of the people and those who teach, train and lead the rebellion. When God gives Jesus, the Son (Psalm 2:7) ownership of creation, He will “break them with a rod of iron and dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel” (Psalm 2:9 ESV). People are to serve Jesus with fear and trembling. If they do not they will perish (Psalm 2:12). This word perishis the same word in both Psalm 1 and here. God speaks twice because He has firmly decided what will occur.

In Psalm 3 Jesus prays to His Father about His passion and the agony of being subject to the wrath and hatred of a people He created in His image for relationship with Him. He loves these people. They hate Him and want Him dead, so they murder Him. They justify their murderous intent by providing false evidence against Him while ignoring the truth of His life, words and works.

During the inquisition of Jesus before the High Priest, He faced questioning about His disciples and His teaching. Note that the position of High Priest at that time was shared by Caiaphas and his father-in-law, Annas (see John 18:13). Traditionally, there was only one High Priest. Caiaphas was the designated High Priest while Annas was the acting head of the religion, having been High Priest and most probably refusing to relinquish control to his son-in-law. Annas touted tradition and law while ignoring tradition and law. It was Annas who first questioned Jesus and responded to His answers.

Jesus answered him, “I have spoken openly to the world. I have always taught in synagogues and in the temple, where all Jews come together. I have said nothing in secret. Why do you ask me? Ask those who have heard me what I said to them; they know what I said.”

When he had said these things, one of the officers standing by struck Jesus with his hand, saying, “Is that how you answer the high priest?”

Jesus answered him, “If what I said is wrong, bear witness about the wrong; but if what I said is right, why do you strike me?” (John 18:20-23 ESV)

Jesus answered truthfully and was struck on the face. Annas, and the guards he controlled, mocked Jesus. They had no intention of looking critically or objectively at the evidence. They wanted Him dead and were willing to sacrifice their integrity and their relationship with God to murder Him.

Those who struck Jesus on the cheek, mocking Him and refusing to examine the evidence, speaking against Him and training others to do the same, will themselves be struck on the cheek. To strike is to hit, beat, slay and kill. Those who condemned Jesus are His enemies, both individual and personal opponents and corporate or national adversaries. They stand resolute against Him in every way conceivable. But God does not speak of His rendered judgment only once. This is a parallel statement because He will surely make it happen. He will break the teeth of those who speak against His Son. To break means to crush, to violently destroy, maim, cripple and rupture. Their words and actions, the thinking of their hearts, will condemn them, used as evidence and testimony against them when they stand before God’s judgment.

Yes, they murdered Jesus. But He rose from the dead and is now the prosecutions expert and only witness against all who rebel against God.

Persecution

Meditations on the Psalms

how many are my foes! Many are rising against me; many are saying of my soul,there is no salvation for him in God. (Psalm 3:1-2 ESV)

Even when surrounded by His enemies, Jesus never complains but looks to God for His deliverance. Foes means narrow and tight, an adversary, enemy or oppressor who is in close quarters. His enemies are rising or standing against Him with murderous hostility. Many is two different words. First, many means to increase, as in a mob of people that grows the longer it exists. Secondly, many means abounding, numerous, strong and great. Both words convey the thought everyone is against the One who is praying. Peoples and nations thunder in anger against the Lord, led and taught to do so by the kings and rulers of nations. “Why do the nations rage and the peoples plot in vain? The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the LORD and against his Anointed” (Psalm 2:1-2).

Just as there is a tri-level, parallel statement describing the ungodly in Psalm 1, so there is a tri-level, parallel statement of those who seek to kill the Lord’s Anointed in this Psalm. Jesus’ first exclamation is to identify those who are seeking to murder Him, His many foes, followed by the truth of their rising up against Him followed by their mocking and ridiculing Him.

Jesus faced these three worldly reactions to His divine presence while nailed to a cross. Great crowds of people, including the religious leaders who condemned Him, came to watch the spectacle of a crucifixion. Plus, the place where the Romans crucified their victims was on a major road into Jerusalem. Travel wasn’t convenient at that time. This was the road many people had to use to enter and leave their capital city for commerce or religious reason.

While hanging helplessly on the cross, Jesus endured verbal abuse from the religion leaders instrumental in having Him murdered by the Romans. They mocked Him throughout His ministry and during His trial before the High Priest. They brought false testimony against Him to justify their actions. They knew His words and works and still mocked Him as He hung, tortured and dying, on the cross. “And the people stood by, watching, but the rulers scoffed at him, saying, ‘He saved others; let him save himself, if he is the Christ of God, his Chosen One!’” (Luke 23:35 ESV; see Matthew 27:28-43, Mark 15:29-32).

There was a second group of mockers at the foot of the cross. Pilate wrote and placed a placard and instructed the guards to hang it  over Jesus’ head while on the cross. “This is the King of the Jews” (Luke 23:38 ESV; see Matthew 27:37, Mark 15:26, John 19:19-22). Pilate specifically asked if Jesus thought He was the king of the Jews during His part of the kangaroo trial. The placard was an insult to the Jewish people. It suggested a crazy man was hanging below it on the cross. In addition, those directed by Pilate to crucify people had no political acumen or understanding of what they were doing. Trained to view people as objects, the soldiers heaped abuse on the Man. “If you are the King of the Jews, save yourself!” (Luke 23:37 ESV).

Jesus hung on a cross between two men found guilty of crimes against the people and empire of Rome. We do not know their crimes. “Two others, who were criminals, were led away to be put to death with him. And when they came to the place that is called The Skull, there they crucified him, and the criminals, one on his right and one on his left” (Luke 23:32-33 ESV; see Matthew 27:38, Mark 15: 27-28, John 19:18). One of the condemned criminals took up the chant of the religious leaders and Roman soldiers, chiding and mocking Jesus as He died with them. “Are you not the Christ? Save yourself and us!” (Luke 23:39 ESV).

What is the taunt hurled at Jesus while on the Cross. It is what He prayed as revealed in the Psalm. “Many are saying of my soul, there is no salvation for him in God.”

The other criminal did not taunt Jesus but saw Him as innocent and undeserving of torture and death. “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? And we indeed justly, for we are receiving the due reward of our deeds; but this man has done nothing wrong.” (Luke 23:40-41 ESV). He then spoke to Jesus, believing the Man dying on a cross next to him, dying as he would die, was the King of kings. “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom” (Luke 23:42 ESV).

Jesus did not come to save Himself from the cross but to save everyone from the wrath of God and eternal separation from the absolute source of life. Jesus promised the man dying next to Him “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise” (Luke 23:43 ESV). Only God can deliver on such a promise.

Why Do the Nations Rage?

Meditations on the Psalms

Why do the nations rage and the peoples plot in vain? The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, (Psalm 2:1-2 ESV)

All peoples and nations fight against God. God asks Why? For what reason are the nations doing this? How did they come to the place where such thinking of their hearts is justified? What has God done to illicit a violent and consuming belief followed by insidious action? Why?

Nations refers to a large group of people or locusts or other animals and refers to all countries. Some translations use the word heathen instead of nations. People refers to the individuals of each nation. Rage means to scheme a tumultuous mutiny and plot in vain means to moan or mutter, to devise and imagine idle and empty thoughts. Thus, large groups of people, whole communities and societies, collectively believe and promote wrong thinking and violence against God.

God penetrates to the heart of the mutiny by identifying those who instigated such thinking. It is the leaders and teachers training the people. The kings of the earth set themselves means the kings of the entire planet who have planted their feet firmly, stationing themselves to take a stand. The rulers take counsel together means those who carry the weight and burden of leading the people daily have laid a foundation and seated themselves close together to consult and decide the actions of the entire group. Thus, the national leaders have listened to their counselors who have all agreed their position and place before God is unacceptable.

What king would allow his subjects to rebel in such a fashion? What ruler would discover and allow a conspiracy to develop in their presence? Do they not know before whom they are speaking and thinking and conspiring? No king would allow this to happen. Kings would squash the conspiracy and put the conspirators to death, or at least replace them with those who are loyal and support him and his authority. Why do any think God will allow rebellion against Him?

Peter and John, after the ascension of Jesus, found themselves before the people of Jerusalem declaring the resurrection of Jesus. Several times they were confronted by the same religious leaders who had condemned Jesus. As they entered the Temple they encountered a lame man begging for money. Instead of giving him money they healed him in the name of Jesus in front of crowds of people.

And he took him by the right hand and raised him up, and immediately his feet and ankles were made strong. And leaping up, he stood and began to walk, and entered the temple with them, walking and leaping and praising God. And all the people saw him walking and praising God, and recognized him as the one who sat at the Beautiful Gate of the temple, asking for alms. And they were filled with wonder and amazement at what had happened to him. (Acts 3:7-10 ESV)

After this miracle and while Peter and John were teaching, the religious leaders sent guards to arrest them and bring them before the same High Priest who arrested and executed Jesus, using the Romans as executioners. Peter spoke to the assembled counsel of religious leaders about their complicity in arresting Jesus and His death, but also about His resurrection. Also, before them, stood the man healed of his lameness. They threatened Peter and John, telling them to no longer teach Jesus and released them.

When relating their experience to the rest of the disciples they prayed and quoted from Psalm 2:

“Sovereign Lord, who made the heaven and the earth and the sea and everything in them, who through the mouth of our father David, your servant, said by the Holy Spirit,

“‘Why did the Gentiles rage, and the peoples plot in vain? The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers were gathered together, against the Lord and against his Anointed’—

for truly in this city there were gathered together against your holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, along with the Gentiles and the peoples of Israel, to do whatever your hand and your plan had predestined to take place.” (Acts 4:24-28 ESV)

All leaders of all nations are fighting against the eternal God and against His Son, Jesus Christ.

Eternal Success

Meditations on the Psalms

In all that he does, he prospers. (Psalm 1:3 ESV)

Who is He? He is the man blessed by God, Jesus Christ. Every motivation, act and word He does or utters brings eternal success because His strength and fruitfulness comes from abiding in God’s will. Prosper means to advance and make progress. He is successful, not as the world suggests success, which comes from sin and ungodliness. But, as God defines success, which is found in His person and will.

In my opinion, there are three elements to the formula for defining success, either in the world or in eternity. First, does the thing done have substance? Can it be counted? “Zero” is nothing. “One” is something. Secondly, does the thing with substance have a quality? Is the quality good or bad, shoddy or exceptional? Everything has a quality. But, substance and quality does not make successful. Finally, how long does the quality thing last? Does it last for time or for eternity? Only that which exists for eternity qualifies as successful.

In our world, only the Word of God, that is Jesus Christ, and people will continue to exist for eternity. Jesus is eternal. People, created in the image of God, have a beginning but are not created to cease to exist. Being separated from God does not mean the person will cease to exist but will be separated from that which sustains existence. Substance existing without sustenance is supreme failure.

Jesus did many things for people. While John the Baptizer was in prison, before he was murdered by Herod, He sent his disciples to ask if Jesus was Messiah.

And Jesus answered them, ‘Go and tell John what you hear and see: the blind receive their sight and the lame walk, lepers are cleansed and the deaf hear, and the dead are raised up, and the poor have good news preached to them. And blessed is the one who is not offended by me’” (Matthew 11:4-6 ESV).

Facing the High Priest before His crucifixion, Jesus spoke again about His words and actions.  Nothing He did or said was done in private. Everything He did and said was open to scrutiny and verification by those who heard and saw Him, including of the religious leaders who were condemning Him.

“I have spoken openly to the world. I have always taught in synagogues and in the temple, where all Jews come together. I have said nothing in secret. Why do you ask me? Ask those who have heard me what I said to them; they know what I said.”

When he had said these things, one of the officers standing by struck Jesus with his hand, saying, “Is that how you answer the high priest?”

Jesus answered him, “If what I said is wrong, bear witness about the wrong; but if what I said is right, why do you strike me?” (John 18:20-23 ESV).

They crucified Jesus, using the weapon of the Romans to brutally murder Him. Then He rose from the dead, resurrected to never again face death. He fulfilled all He was given to do by God for the redemption of people from God’s wrath. Everything Jesus did was eternally successful and advanced the will of God. “We know that Christ, being raised from the dead, will never die again; death no longer has dominion over him. For the death he died he died to sin, once for all, but the life he lives he lives to God” (Romans 6:9-10 ESV).

Everything Jesus did, from creating the world and it contains, to the people He made in the image of God, is eternally successful. We may also say that all He did glorified God. Man was created to serve God. Jesus came as fully man the way man was originally intended, with those eternal qualities which make a servant a servant. He who is fully God “emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men” (Philippians 2:7 ESV). Everything Jesus does prospers eternally.