Category Archives: First Peter

Misunderstood

Alien-Immigrants and Strangers

Beloved, I urge you as aliens and strangers to abstain from the passions of the flesh, which wage war against your soul (1 Peter 2:11).

Christians live as both alien-immigrants in the world and as strangers, visitors just passing through the world, picking up those things needed for eternity.

Peter’s letter has three sections. Section one is chapter 1:1-12. God the Father works eternally in the lives of those who are alien immigrants in the world. Section two is from chapter 1:13 through chapter 2:10. The Holy Spirit has set apart the Christian and they are strangers in the world looking forward to their home in eternity.

Finally, the third section is in 2:11-5:14, the work of God the Son is made known through both suffering (for righteousness’ sake) in the world and with obedience to the Divine will. Peter combines both words (parapedemos and paroikos) into one phrase (2:11) to show the essential dichotomy faced by Christians as they live in a world which causes their suffering while remaining obedient to Jesus Christ, their Lord and Savior, who also suffered for them.

Scripture recognizes the difference between the alien-immigrant and the stranger, between those who accept the host county as their own or those who are just passing through using the host country to meet their needs. During the exodus, in the Hebrew Scripture, God is clear on His position concerning the alien-immigrant and the stranger in the larger context of His people. As the nation of Israel was exiting Egypt, God commanded them to eat a Passover feast, and to celebrate this feast and their miraculous release from slavery by the powerful hand of God.

And the LORD said to Moses and Aaron, “This is the statute of the Passover: no foreigner shall eat of it, but every slave that is bought for money may eat of it after you have circumcised him. No foreigner or hired worker may eat of it. It shall be eaten in one house; you shall not take any of the flesh outside the house, and you shall not break any of its bones. All the congregation of Israel shall keep it. If a stranger shall sojourn with you and would keep the Passover to the LORD, let all his males be circumcised. Then he may come near and keep it; he shall be as a native of the land. But no uncircumcised person shall eat of it. There shall be one law for the native and for the stranger who sojourns among you.” (Exodus 12:43-51 ESV)

Foreigner means the son of an alien or someone who does not consider Israel their home, either by birth or by decision. No person who refuses to identify with God or His people may eat and celebrate the Passover. Non-native people can celebrate the Passover. A servant or slavewho is circumcised, and by circumcision has identified with Israel, may eat the Passover. This is an important distinction. God recognizes the difference between those who are separated out from the world and dedicated to Him, and those who are separated from Him and identify with the world. The Passover was an annual celebration of remembering those who are God’s being saved from death as the Destroying Angel kills all the first born of those people who are in rebellion against God. In this case it is the Egyptian, and any who were in the borders of Egypt during the last plague.

Peter calls the Christian alien-immigrants and strangers. “Beloved, I urge you as alien-immigrants and strangers to abstain from the passions of the flesh, which wage war against your soul” (1Peter 2:11). Those who identify with Christ are citizens of the kingdom of heaven, temporarily residing as citizen of an earthly kingdom. They are refugees, unable to return to their real home until the war is over and God calls them home. Their attitude is one of knowing they are different yet accepting the citizenship in a place without embracing all of the cultural norms of the citizen of that place. They are displaced for a time and placed by God where they are His witnesses. They are the parapedemos.

But, Christians are also the paroikos, the stranger who is temporarily in a place to gain what they can before returning home. God is preparing the Christian for eternity and uses the trials and persecutions of the world to form the Christian into a spiritual being fit for eternity with Him. Because Christians are not citizens of the world and do not identify with the cultural traits of the world, the world and those in the world hate them, are suspicious of them and disdain them.

Christians live their lives in dichotomy. On one hand they live and vote and act like citizens of an earthly kingdom while knowing they are not. Our home is in eternity with God but we must act like our temporary lives in the world have significance and purpose. On the other hand, we reject the morality and culturally acceptable practices of the world when they conflict with God’s will. We act like our temporary lives in this world and the things we have and collect have no eternal value because we look forward to an inheritance that is eternal. Is it any wonder Christians and Christianity is misunderstood, compromised and disparaged?

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Strangers in the World

Studies in First Peter

Conduct yourselves with fear throughout the time of your exile (sojourning) (1 Peter 1:17 ESV)

Peter’s second section of his epistle, in 1:13-2:10, shows the work of the Holy Spirit inside of each Christian making them ready for heaven through the three-part process of sanctification. Peter uses the word paroikos, a different word than used in 1:1, to show the kingdom of heaven on earth and the power of the Holy Spirit to set the Christian apart for holy service. A paroikos is a person from another kingdom who lives in a place for only a short time in order to accomplish a specific goal or purpose. They are citizens of God’s kingdom and are simply passing through the world to their true home.

Paroikos is the second Greek word Peter uses and is also translated exile but actually means a person who is stopping over or staying for a short period of time as they travel from once place to the next. They may be a businessman or even a tourist. “And if you call on him as Father who judges impartially according to each one’s deeds, conduct yourselves with fear throughout the time of your exile (sojourn) (1Peter 1:17 ESV). Other writers of the New Testament use the same word in the same sense, referring to those who are simply traveling through a country for a short time, unlike the immigrant who will stay indefinitely.

During Paul’s first missionary journey, he traveled to various cities speaking to the local Jews and others who would listen. In Antioch of Pisidia, on the Sabbath, Paul gave those who were listening a history lesson about the nation of Israel. “The God of this people Israel chose our fathers and made the people great during their stay (dwelt as strangers, paroikia) in the land of Egypt, and with uplifted arm he led them out of it” (Acts 13:17 ESV). Stephen, before he was murdered, gave the history of Israel as part of his witness and defense of the gospel. “And God spoke to this effect—that his offspring would be sojourners (paroikos) in a land belonging to others, who would enslave them and afflict them four hundred years”  (Acts 7:6 ESV). Paul wrote to the Ephesians stating that where they had been estranged from God they were now able to live in His presence. “So then you are no longer strangers (xenos) and aliens (sojourners, paroikos), but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God” (Ephesians 2:19 ESV).

Unlike the parapedemos, the alien immigrant, the paroikos, stranger,  has decided to be in the host country for a short, designated time. There is no thought of adopting the culture, language or identity of the visited country because they are not going to stay. They are a traveler, a tourist, a businessperson, who is only in the country to gain something the country has and then return to their own country. They may just be travelling through on their way to another place or on their way home. The may be visiting out of curiosity, for an experience. They may be on a business trip, to gain a product or a treaty. They are using the host country to meet their needs, wants or desires.

The Christian, not a citizen of this world, still lives in the world, and is extended rights and privileges commensurate with that standing.  Those who are reborn are no longer native-born citizens and therefore will not conform to the standards demanded by native-born citizens. The Christian is a foreigner, residing for a short time in a place not his home. God uses the world in which we live as a training ground for eternity, teaching us that which we need to know about Himself and His kingdom before He finally brings the Christian home. Christians are citizens of the kingdom of heaven in the world for only a short time. Life may seem long, but when compared with eternity, which is not constrained by time, is only a blip on the timeline of history.

Alien Immigrants

Studies in First Peter

To those who are elect exiles (immigrants) of the Dispersion (1 Peter 1:1 ESV)

Our true home is not in this world but in eternity with God. Those who are citizens of His kingdom think differently about God, about themselves and about the world in which they live, than those who are citizens of the world. Peter uses the word exiles, people who are foreigners or aliens (parepidemos), to show the focus of the Christian remaining on God the Father.

In the first section of his letter, 1:1-12, Peter affirms it is God the Father who determines to provide and assure salvation for each citizen of His kingdom. He guarantees their place with Him in eternity and gives protection while they His live in a corrupt world.

When most people think of the word exilesthey imagine persons displaced by war or natural disaster, whose home or country is so violently attacked or destroyed they can no longer safely live there. Or, they think of someone who, for political or criminal reasons, has been forcibly removed from their home country as a punishment. For those displaced by war the exile flees for their own safety. Those punished are forcibly removed from their country. But this is not what the Greek word (parepidemos) means. A better translation is either alien or immigrantor both. An immigrant may have had to flee their country because of persecution or war. But immigrants usually want to come to a new country to live and to become a citizen of that country. They purposefully move from one country and culture, which was theirs, to another country and culture they make theirs.

According to Thayer’s exile (immigrant) (parapedimos) means one who comes from a foreign country to live side by side with those who are natives of the host country. They are foreigners who live in a strange place. “Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, To those who are elect exiles(read immigrants) of the Dispersion in Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia” (1Peter 1:1 ESV). In the context of 1 Peter 1:1, Christians are those who hold citizenship in heaven while living their lives on earth. Peter is writing to all Christians, but especially the Jews, who are part of the dispersion, the Diaspora. They are Jews scattered throughout the nations of the known world. Currently, the term Disapoa may also refer to Christians scattered throughout the world. Christians have dual citizenship. While living on earth the Christian lives according to the customs and culture of the nation in which they reside while remaining constantly aware of their citizenship in heaven.

The writer of the letter to the Hebrews couples the word alien immigrant with the word xenos. “These all died in faith, not having received the things promised, but having seen them and greeted them from afar, and having acknowledged that they were strangers (xenos) and exiles (parapidemos) on the earth” (Hebrews 11:13 ESV). Xenosmeans foreigner or stranger, or someone who is not familiar with the country in which they find themselves. They are not immigrants, though they are alien. Thus, the writer of Hebrews describes those who wait patiently and faithfully for God to act and consider themselves strangers even while they are living in the culture of a host country.

Jesus describes the citizen of the kingdom of heaven as both salt and light.

You are the salt of the earth, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trampled under people’s feet. You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven. (Matthew 5:13-16 ESV)

God does not physically separate out those who are His from the world though He does separate them out as His. He disperses them throughout the world as witnesses of the Gospel. Christians live in the world as full citizens of the kingdom of God, temporarily removed from their true home, which is in eternity with God.

Aliens and Strangers in the World

Studies in First Peter

Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, To those who are elect exiles of the Dispersion in Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, in the sanctification of the Spirit, for obedience to Jesus Christ and for sprinkling with his blood: May grace and peace be multiplied to you. (1 Peter 1:1-2 ESV)

Christians are a peculiar people. Not odd or weird but unusual and unconventional. Christians live in a world, adopting most of the cultural norms of the societies in which they live while knowing they are heaven bound and that the world is not their final home. We live in the world but are not of the world. We look like everyone else but do not act according to the immoral, ungodly dictates of the world in which we live.

Peter gives instruction to people who find themselves at odds with the world, sometimes violently at odds, because of their focus on eternity. The world and all that it contains will cease to exist. People will die and leave all that they have gathered to others, who will in turn die, passing on their possessions to yet others. There is no hope in this world except in the present. Christians hope in God who is eternal and who has promised, through Jesus Christ to bring them into His presence for eternity.

Peter has written a letter that is both easy to understand on the surface with sections that are difficult to comprehend. Peter, an eyewitness to Jesus’ words and works, a disciple of Christ and the leader of the twelve apostles, shows his experience in living for Christ and knowledge of deep spiritual matters, in this short epistle.

First Peter is divided into three main sections.  Each section shows one member of the Triune Godhead working in the Christian and in the Church, the Body of Christ.  The theme of First Peter is that Christians are aliens and strangers in the world, and drives the points Peter wants to make in each of the three sections. Throughout each section, Peter give his readers the tools they need to understand the work of God to live as Christians in a sinful and hateful world. (What are these tools? They are the spiritual disciplines found in the Sermon on the Mount.) His main concern is for Christians to view themselves in an eternal light.  For this reason he identifies them as sojourners in the world.  But he uses two different words to describe their position: “aliens” and “strangers.”

As I was growing up as an Air Force brat who lived in Europe for six years, family members of those in the military service were called “good will ambassadors.” I was a US citizen living in a foreign country. I had no idea what an “ambassador” was. I just knew that, according to my dad, I better be on my best behavior. I represented the United States, the Military Base where we were stationed, and my father and family. If I got in trouble then the United States was in trouble, the Base was in trouble and my father was in trouble. My dad was a First Sergeant and he made sure I understood that if he got in trouble I was in big trouble. Being a “good will ambassador” meant nothing to me. I completely understood what it meant to be in trouble with my dad.

People in a country not their own fall into two primary categories. Either they are just visiting for a short time or they have pulled up stakes in their home country and are living permanently in their host country.

Peter uses two Greek words to describe the Christian in the world. The English words used to translate the Greek words are unfortunate. I have come to understand what these two Greek words mean from being forced to live in a country not my own. In the English Standard Version both words are translated exiles. Neither word means exile.

Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, To those who are elect exiles (1 Peter 1:1 ESV).

Conduct yourselves with fear throughout the time of your exile (1 Peter 1:17 ESV).

Beloved, I urge you as sojourners (exiles) and exiles to abstain from the passions of the flesh, which wage war against your soul (1 Peter 2:11 ESV).

The first word is better translated, alienor immigrant. The second word is better translated, sojourner or stranger.

Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, To those who are aliensor immigrants (1 Peter 1:1 ESV).

Conduct yourselves with fear throughout the time of your sojourn (1 Peter 1:17 ESV).

Beloved, I urge you as aliens and strangersto abstain from the passions of the flesh, which wage war against your soul (1 Peter 2:11 ESV).

Understanding these two words is critical to understanding the First Epistle of Peter.

Peter, Suffering for Righteousness’ Sake

Studies in First Peter

Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ  (1 Peter 1:1 ESV)

John 21:18-22

Three times Peter denied Christ before those who murdered Him. Three times Jesus commissioned Peter to care for His Church. Peter received his marching orders, given a specific directive and mandate to teach and care for those who follow Jesus.

Jesus also hints to Peter what will happen in his future. While Jesus gives general predictions about what some Christians may suffer because of their relationship with Him, Peter receives a strong, pointed indication of how he will die. He feared standing before the authorities, who accused Jesus of blasphemy, desiring to kill Him. Peter ran when confronted by a mob and lied when confronted by a servant girl. Jesus taught His disciples that they would stand before authorities and to not worry about what they would say.

Beware of men, for they will deliver you over to courts and flog you in their synagogues, and you will be dragged before governors and kings for my sake, to bear witness before them and the Gentiles. When they deliver you over, do not be anxious how you are to speak or what you are to say, for what you are to say will be given to you in that hour. For it is not you who speak, but the Spirit of your Father speaking through you. (Matthew 10:17-20 ESV)

Jesus indicated that Peter would die in the same way Jesus had died, by crucifixion. But, Jesus was standing before Peter, resurrected from death, telling him these things. Peter would stand before the authorities and speak to them about his relationship with Christ. He would not deny Christ or lie about that relationship. And he will suffer the same death His Master suffered.  “Truly, truly, I say to you, when you were young, you used to stretch out your hands, and another will dress you and carry you where you do not want to go” (John 21:18 ESV). Peter would suffer for righteousness’ sake.

John wrote his gospel after Peter’s death. His next statement is parenthetical. “(This he said to show by what kind of death he was to glorify God)” (John 21:19 ESV). John lived a long life of witness and persecution, finally being exiled toward the end of the century, to the island of Patmos where he died. His brother, James, was the first martyr of the disciples, murdered by Herod, who also imprisoned Peter. “He killed James the brother of John with the sword, and when he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to arrest Peter also” (Acts 12:2-3 ESV). Peter was miraculously delivered from prison by angels (Acts 12:6-11). It was not time for him to die. All people will die only when God determines their lives in the world are completed.

Jesus gave Peter the same command here that He had given when He called the disciples. “And after saying this he said to him, ‘Follow me’” (John 21:19 ESV). Jesus expects absolute obedience to His commands from the person called. We are not afforded the luxury of comparing ourselves with others. Nor does Jesus command groups to follow Him. His summons is for the individual. We are called to stand alone before the authorities and give our witness of Jesus. When Peter turned and asked about another disciple, Jesus once again rebuked him. He did not want to go alone but, in the end, was willing. Death is an individual thing. Though large groups die together each dies separately. “When Peter saw him, he said to Jesus, “Lord, what about this man?” (John 21:21 ESV).

There were two parts to Jesus’ answer. First was the will of God. That God has a purpose for each person becomes evident in this statement. That His purpose for one may affect others and does not preclude the demand all obey. “If it is my will that he remain until I come, what is that to you? You follow me!” (John 21:22 ESV). Jesus has told His disciples they must pick up their crosses and follow Him. “And whoever does not take his cross and follow me is not worthy of me” (Matthew 10:38 ESV; see Matthew 16:24, Mark 8:34, Luke 9:23-24, Luke 14:27).

Secondly, Jesus reiterates the command for Peter to follow Him. “You follow me!” (John 21:22). It does not matter what others do or believe. It does not matter what happens to others. They are responsible to God. Each is responsible for their actions, motivations, thoughts and words. If they follow Jesus, good. If they do not follow Jesus, you must. Our following Jesus is not dictated by the circumstances we encounter in the world but by His call and our obedience.

Jesus Commissions Peter

Studies in First Peter

Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ (1 Peter 1:1 ESV)

John 21:15-17

Jesus never condemned Peter for any of his misstatements or compulsive actions. He rebuked Peter on many occasions. He predicted Peter would run away from Him during His arrest, just as all of His disciples fled. Jesus also knew Peter would verbally deny Him before those who wanted Him dead. Knowing what Peter would do does not mean Peter lost his position as the unofficial leader of the disciples. Peter did not need to be reinstated as a disciple because he had never lost his position as a disciple. Judas lost his position as a disciple when he murdered himself.

We are enabled to come to Jesus only because God draws us to Him.  Jesus calls everyone to come to Him, and those who are willing, respond. His call is not a request but a command. Those who respond do so out of obedience to God’s command. Those who do not come do so out of rebellion and hatred for God. God does everything needed for redemption, yet each person must still obey.

Jesus asks Peter three times if he loves Him. Why three times? Could it be Jesus is responding to Peter’s three denials, which Jesus predicted?

When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” 

He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.”

He said to him, “Feed my lambs.”

He said to him a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” 

He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.”

He said to him, “Tend my sheep.”

He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” 

Peter was grieved because he said to him the third time, “Do you love me?” and he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.”

Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep.” (John 21:15-17 ESV)

In this passage there are two words used for love. The first word is agapao, which means Godly, or high and devoted love. The second word is phileo, or love as a friend and can mean to kiss.  Jesus asks the first two times “do you agapao me” and Peter answers “yes, I phileo you.” Finally, Jesus meets Peter at his level and asks him “do you phileo me” and Peter answers in kind.  Jesus is challenging Peter’s love and Peter is grieved, or “cut to the heart” by Jesus’ questions.

Jesus, after each question, gives Peter a command. After the first question Peter is to “feed my lambs” and then to “feed my sheep.”  To feed means to give nourishment. It is the same word used when Jesus cast out Legion from the demoniac and there were pigs feeding nearby (see Matthew 8:30, Mark 5:11, Luke 8:32). Peter is to provide spiritual nourishment for those people who are new followers of Christ as well as those who are more mature in their faith. After the second question about Peter’s love, Jesus tells him to “tend my sheep” which means to govern or rule, to cherish as one’s own body and to serve the flock or Church. Christ is the head of His body, the Church. “And he put all things under his feet and gave him as head over all things to the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills all in all” (Ephesians 1:22-23 ESV; see also Colossians 1:18). It is Peter’s work to be a fisher of men and to lead those so caught in their relationship with Christ.

Jesus uses both words, agapao and phileo, throughout His teaching, referring to the love God has for those created in His image and the love they return to Him because of their nature. It is the divine nature of man created in the image of God to love, agapao, those also created in His image. Even those who are considered the enemies of God are of such great value they are loved by God. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven” (Matthew 5:43-45 ESV). In addition, those who are His show the evidence of their love for God through their obedience to His commands.

Whoever has my commandments and keeps them, he it is who loves me. And he who loves me will be loved by my Father, and I will love him and manifest myself to him.”

Judas (not Iscariot) said to him, “Lord, how is it that you will manifest yourself to us, and not to the world?”

Jesus answered him, “If anyone loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him. Whoever does not love me does not keep my words. And the word that you hear is not mine but the Father’s who sent me. (John 14:21-24 ESV)

Our commission, like Peter’s commission, is to love God and those with whom we live.

Peter’s Denial

Studies in First Peter

Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ (1 Peter 1:1 ESV)

Luke 54-60 – Parallel Passages: Matt. 26:31-35, 69-75; Mark 14:27-31, 66-72; John 13:37-38; 18:15-18, 25-27

Peter may be the leader of the group of disciples but he represented every person in his actions at Jesus’ arrest. Do his arrogant boasts of following Christ to prison and death represent all Christians? Do his rash reactions, like swinging a sword and cutting off the ear of one of the people who came to arrest Jesus, represent all Christians? Does his running away when confronted by the world represent all Christians? Peter, and the other disciples, abandoned Christ, just as He said they would. Only Mark and Matthew tell us Jesus’ disciples ran away in fear. “And they all left him and fled” (Mark 14:50 ESV; see Matthew 26:56). Jesus had already predicted that those who were with Him would scatter. During His last the Passover celebration He taught them about Himself and the coming of the Holy Spirit. He was leaving them and going back to His Father.

Behold, the hour is coming, indeed it has come, when you will be scattered, each to his own home, and will leave me alone. Yet I am not alone, for the Father is with me. I have said these things to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world. (John 16:32-33 ESV)

Jesus also tells them that their abandoning Him was prophesied long ago. “You will all fall away, for it is written, ‘I will strike the shepherd, and the sheep will be scattered’” (Mark 14:27 ESV; see Zechariah 13:7). Zechariah wrote his prophecy over 500 years earlier. Jesus does not condemn His disciples for what they will do but encourages them to not allow their fallen nature to overcome them. He tells them to take heart for He has overcome the world.

Peter, and those with him, will run away. We must be honest with ourselves, we would probably run away also, under the same circumstances. I would probably run away. One of characteristics of the fallen nature is the tug and pull away from righteousness even when the image of God within drives toward Him who is righteous. We are afraid of the world and have such little or nonexistent faith in God that when the world rears its violent head we may fight for a moment but eventually flee. No one, in and of themselves, is strong enough to stand against the force of the world directed by the venomous lies of the Deceiver. Only God is strong. We do not overcome the world. Jesus overcomes the world. We must be driven to the place where we recognize His strength in us under His control. This is what happens with Peter and the other disciples.

Once Jesus was arrested Peter and John followed at a distance. We assume John went because John records what happens. John is known to the High Priest and helps bring Peter into the courtyard where Jesus is being interrogated. Three times Peter is asked about his relationship with Jesus and three times he denies knowing Him.

Then they seized him and led him away, bringing him into the high priest’s house, and Peter was following at a distance. And when they had kindled a fire in the middle of the courtyard and sat down together, Peter sat down among them. Then a servant girl, seeing him as he sat in the light and looking closely at him, said, “This man also was with him.” But he denied it, saying, “Woman, I do not know him.”

And a little later someone else saw him and said, “You also are one of them.” But Peter said, “Man, I am not.”

And after an interval of about an hour still another insisted, saying, “Certainly this man also was with him, for he too is a Galilean.” But Peter said, “Man, I do not know what you are talking about.” And immediately, while he was still speaking, the rooster crowed. (Luke 22:54-60 ESV).

Three times in an hour, Peter denied knowing Christ even though he was the leader of the disciples. Two things happened. Jesus who was enduring the derisive grilling of those who hated Him turned and looked at Peter. Jesus knew Peter was there because Jesus was aware of everything that was happening and that would happen. “And the Lord turned and looked at Peter. And Peter remembered the saying of the Lord, how he had said to him, ‘Before the rooster crows today, you will deny me three times.’ And he went out and wept bitterly” (Luke 22:61-62 ESV). When Peter realized what he had done he broke down and wept. He saw the emptiness of his boasting and his actions grieved him.

Our sin and the realization of the consequences of our sin, should drive us to grief. But the life of the Christian does not stop with grief and mourning. Peter did not fade away but became the leader of the Church, the Body of Christ. Peter may have momentarily abandoned Jesus but Jesus will never abandon him, or us. Though Satan asked to sift him, and God gave Satan permission to do so, Jesus still prayed for Peter and told him what to do once the trial was over. “Simon, Simon, behold, Satan demanded to have you, that he might sift you like wheat, but I have prayed for you that your faith may not fail. And when you have turned again, strengthen your brothers” (Luke 22:31-32 ESV). Peter would live out his life in faith doing exactly what Christ instructed. Peter would strengthen all those who follow Christ throughout the ages.